Episode 9: Harry Josephine Giles

Traverse Theatre Company Hosted by Debbie Hannan

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About

In our final episode of 2020, host Debbie Hannan chats to writer, performer and Edinburgh resident, Harry Josephine Giles.

Harry Josephine Giles is a writer and performer from Orkney, who now lives in Edinburgh, where they co-founded the spoken word events series Inky Fingers and co-directs the live art platform Anatomy. They hold an MA in Theatre Directing from East 15 Acting School, and are studying for a PhD at Stirling University. They chat to Debbie about workers' theatre, when art is mistaken for terrorism, the mental strain of the pandemic, and the excitement of working across art forms.

Part of The Traverse Podcast series.

The Traverse Podcast is available on Spotify, Acast and Apple Podcasts.

A transcript for this episode can be downloaded at the bottom of this page.

The Traverse is funded by Creative Scotland and The City of Edinburgh Council, with additional support from The Scottish Government Performing Arts Venues Relief Fund.

Design by everyonelovescake.co.uk


This episode's guest: Harry Josephine Giles

Harry Josephine Giles is a writer and performer from Orkney, who now lives in Edinburgh, where they co-founded the spoken word events series Inky Fingers and co-directs the live art platform Anatomy. They hold an MA in Theatre Directing from East 15 Acting School, and are studying for a PhD at Stirling University.

As a performer, Harry Josephine has been featured in the SPILL National Platform, and programmed by festivals and venues including the Ovalhouse, Forest Fringe and Sprint. Their performance lecture This is not a riot toured to Italy in 2012, and their one-to-one show What We Owe has toured European festivals 2013-17, including in Slovenia, Latvia and Romania. What We Owe was also listed in the Guardian’s “Best of the Edinburgh Fringe” 2014 round-up — in the “But is it art?” section. They also do vocals in the punk band Fit To Work. Their current touring show is Drone, a poetry, video and sound show about technology, gender and anxiety, and is part of the 2019 Made in Scotland showcase at the Edinburgh Fringe.

As a poet, Harry Josephine has toured North America, given feature performances at venues from the Bowery Poetry Club to the Soho Theatre; hosted events at festivals from StAnza to Edinburgh’s Hogmanay, won multiple slams including the UK Student Slam (2008), the BBC Scotland Slam (2009), the Glasgow Slam (2010); and been published in journals including Magma, Gutter, PANK, Irish Pages, and New Writing Scotland. They won the IdeasTap National Poetry Competition in 2012, and their first collection Tonguit (Freight Books) was shortlisted for both the Edward Morgan Poetry Award (2014) and the Forward Prize for Best First Collection (2016). Their most recent publication is The Games (Outspoken Press, 2018). Other publications include the pamphlet Oam for Govanhill Baths (Stewed Rhubarb), a box of postcards for the Crichton Carbon Centre (Farmform, 2014), a map of games for the Nevis Land Partnership (Casual Games for Casual Hikers, 2015), and a collaborative neural network rewriting border ballads for the Common Guild (New Minstrelsy, 2018). Harry Josephine is currently undetaking a PhD at te Universty of Stirling in Creative Writing, with a focus on minority language poetry.

As a game-maker, Harry Josephine has designed games for Now Play This, Book Week Scotland, Winchester City Council, the BBC, and more. Their game The Chinese Room, co-written with Joey Jones, came 5th in the 2007 international Interactive Fiction Competition, and their twine game Raik was featured in PC World, Rock Paper Shotgun and IndieGames.com.

Often the theatre, poetry and games get muddle together into hybrid forms.

Harry Josephine has developed and delivered workshops for organisations including Keats House, People & Planet, and the Edinburgh International Science Festival. They were artist-in-residence for Govanhill Baths in 2013, the Crichton Carbon Centre in 2013-14 and the Nevis Land Partnership in 2016,

In Edinburgh, Harry Josephine founded Inky Fingers, a spoken word events organisation, co-directs the nationally-funded quarterly performance art platform ANATOMY at Summerhall, and has been part of the collective behind the Forest Café, Edinburgh’s open access arts space.


Credits

  • Sound engineerRichard Bell
  • ComposerPatricia Panther